Wall Label Mad Libs!

Amy Whitaker has created some hilarious contests on the Art:21 blog recently. One is her “Wall Label Mad Libs”, in which she takes the language of the artist info wall text and turns it into an farcical and entertaining game.

Here is her Wall Label Mad Libs template if you want to try your hand at it:

John Smith’s [or make up a name] work has always been interested in ___________[noun-subject matter, e.g., astronomy, home economics]. Operating at the forefront of the _______[noun-optional: in a foreign language or proper noun]-ist movement, he became fascinated with _______[noun-everyday object], striving to reinvent our very concept of _________[noun-category or platonic ideal]. His sumptuous, _______ [adjective] brushstrokes evoke __________[noun-geographic location] in the ______[decade, e.g., 1960]‘s. Although Clement Greenberg wrote that his work was utter drivel, _________[noun-group of people, e.g., tourists, schoolchildren] have been moved enough by his reconception of __________[noun-category of sensory perception] and _________ [noun-field of philosophy] that they _________[verb-something that activists do].

In this painting ______ [noun-person] sits in a ________[adjective] chair looking at the viewer _________[adverb-describes facial expression]. Over his/her shoulder looms a ______ [noun-animal] peering at him _______ [adverb].

I combined two contests and made a wall label mad lib for this image…

Here is my text:

Rocco Tremont-Somouch’s work has always been interested in physical academics. Operating at the forefront of the German Bastardist movement, he became fascinated with the intersection of garden gnomes and kitchen utensils, striving to reinvent our very concept of unacknowledged compassion and heroic sympathy. His sumptuous, sensitive, yet brutish brushstrokes evoke the Pyrenees in the 1790‘s. Although Clement Greenberg wrote that his work was utter drivel, Frankish Nuns have been moved enough by his reconception of everyday impossibility and the Catechism of the Council of Trent that they threw themselves in a riot of prayer destroying many works in fits of ecstatic revelry.

In this painting Saint Nikolaos of Myra sits in a preternatural chair looking at the viewer in despondent solicitude. Over his shoulder looms an albino sloth peering at him somberly.

Check out Amy’s original posts at the links below and join in the fun!

Post: Department of Audience Participation: Wall Label Winners
(May 23rd, 2011)

Post: Contest! DIY Wall Labels…
(May 12th, 2011)

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